Ligatus news

The Place of Bindings

The Place of bindings

in book history and bibliography: resources and research

This was a two day conference on bookbindings and the study of the history of the book to take place in Oxford on 9-10 June 2011, organised by Ligatus, the Centre for the Study of the Book and CERL and supported by Saint Catherine Foundation. The first day consisted of a series of short papers describing some of the printed and on-line resources for binding studies currently available and the day will end with an evening lecture by Anthony Hobson. The second day was a day-long series of discussions raised by the study of bindings, involving an invited audience.
Speakers of the Place of Bindings conference

The aim of the conference is to try to bridge the gap that exists between the study of bindings and the rest of the bibliographical world, with the result that bindings do not play the interpretative role that they might in the study of the history of the book. They are all too often seen as lying somewhat outside traditional areas of bibliographical research and there are two main reasons for this - firstly, that many people do not fully realise what can be learnt from bindings, both decorated and undecorated, about where, when and by what sort of person a book might have been read, and secondly, even if they are interested, very few people know how to identify and describe what they see in a reliable and consistent manner.  While a great deal of work has been done for many years on the description of the tools used to decorate bindings, the recorded tools still form a small minority of those used and structures and materials remain largely unrecorded. Where they have been recorded (e.g. covering materials) this has often been done inconsistently and all too often inaccurately. The conference is designed to address the questions raised by bringing bindings closer to the centre of the study of the book – a proposition made more urgent these days as the study of the history of the book gains ground in academic circles.

The conference goes under the title “The Place of Bindings”,  and the discussion is intended to bring together a group of 40-50 people from across Europe and from the U.S.A., all of whom are in some way closely involved in handling early books, whether as academics, binding historians, binders, librarians, rare book cataloguers, library managers or booksellers, to discuss the place of bindings in the wider bibliographical world and what would be needed to integrate them more closely in what might be called mainstream bibliographical studies. There are several things that need to happen to make this possible – firstly a commonly-agreed language and format with which to describe them, a means by which bindings can be identifed and located in collections (which means essentially the inclusion of, or links to, useful descriptions of them in rare-book catalogues) and how the electronic world may make the integration of different catalogues and databases easier to use and more useful.

The discussion amongst the invited delegates was recorded with the aim of producing a short publication summarising the discussions, and listing the conclusions and recommendations.

Both days of the conference were fully booked but it was possible to follow the conference live on twitter (#ligatuspob) Follow Ligatus on Twitter.

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The University of Udine Ligatus Summer School 2011 announced

The History of European Bookbinding 1450-1830 and Identifying and recording bookbinding structures for conservation and cataloguing.

Istituto Ellenico di Studi Bizantini e Postbizantini di Venezia, Venice (Italy)
19-23 and 26-30 September 2011

The 2011 Summer School will be run by the Dipartimento di Storia e Tutela dei Beni Culturali of the University of Udine, and will be held this year in collaboration with the Istituto Ellenico di Studi Bizantini e Postbizantini di Venezia. The individual courses will be given by the Ligatus Research Centre as described below. We are delighted to work with the University of Udine in giving these course in the historic city of Venice and particularly in the Istituto Ellenico, which has a distinguished reputation in the field of book studies. This year students will have the opportunity to see bindings in the Museo Correr, the Biblioteca Marciana and the biblioteca di San Francesco della Vigna. With access to these historic collections and the unique environment that the city offers, this year’s summer school will be a unique experience.

For more details and to apply online visit: www.ligatus.org.uk/summerschool

New post: Research Technician

Title: Research Technician, part time
Reference: 300081
Occupation: Technical
College: University of the Arts London
Postion Type: Temporary - Part time
Sector: Ligatus Research Unit
Salary: £26,017 pro rata
Closing Date: 11/03/2011

Job Overview

one year fixed term contract, 20 hours per week

University of the Arts London is a vibrant world centre for innovation, drawing together six Colleges with international reputations in art, design, fashion, communication and performing arts and a long involvement in the book arts and book conservation.

Ligatus is one of the University’s research centres that could transform the role of object documentation in digital humanities. It is set to combine traditional bookbinding and archiving knowledge with the latest web technologies in a whole new way, making this role unique in its field.

At the moment, there is no system in place to manage the considerable volume of data Ligatus is accumulating. As part of the team, you will help to design a new system to organise, publish and optimise Ligatus digital collections. You will then manage and maintain the system, administering the digitised data.

Highly IT literate, you can use XML technologies and administer XML data, XML native databases, relational databases and simple type data. You can also deal with image quality issues and design, code, test and correct batch data processing scripts and macro-commands for both text and images.

Articulate, organised and team-focused, you have worked on digital humanities projects before and handled text encoding. Perhaps most importantly, you have an interest in the history of material culture, plus the ideas and enthusiasm needed to get a new research centre off the ground.

This is one of the two positions currently offered by Ligatus, with the second one being a part time Research Assistant.

In return, University of the Arts London offers generous leave, a final salary pension and a commitment to your continuing personal development and training in an environment that encourages excellence, creativity and diversity.

Please download an application pack and then upload your completed application form by clicking here. If you have any queries about this role that are not covered in the documentation available below please contact Ewelina Warner, Ligatus Administrator. Telephone: 020 7514 6432. Email: e.warner@camberwell.arts.ac.uk

University of the Arts London aims to be an equal opportunities employer embracing diversity in all areas of activity.

New post: Research Assistant

Title: 0.5 Research Assistant - Ligatus
Reference: 300079
Occupation: Academic and Research
College: University of the Arts London
Position Type: Temporary - Part time
Sector: Ligatus Research Unit
Salary: £26,017 pro rata
Closing Date: 11/03/2011

Job Overview

one year fixed term contract

University of the Arts London is a vibrant world centre for innovation, drawing together six Colleges with international reputations in art, design, fashion, communication and performing arts and a long involvement in the book arts and book conservation.

This is a rare opportunity to work alongside pioneers in the study of bookbinding and book conservation, gaining experience and knowledge that is not otherwise widely available. You will join a dynamic team of researchers and play a key role in developing a new field of study which combines historic bookbinding with digital tools.

Your chief responsibility will be to work in collaboration with Ligatus team members and a range of experts from Europe and the USA to help compile a glossary of bookbinding terms, and your responsibilities will include digitising, organising and filing extensive collections of slides of historic bookbindings.

Your organisational and communication skills will be needed to help organise workshops and conferences on historic bookbinding. As the first point of contact for online academic discussions on historic bookbinding, you will also manage content on the Ligatus website. Actively joining in with discussions, keeping records and disseminating conclusions will be central to your success.

To excel, you will need research experience in the field of bookbinding, book conservation or book history. We are also looking for an excellent understanding of historical bookbinding structures combined with a good knowledge of current work in the field. You will need to be up-to-date with current terminologies.

As well as your post-graduate or research degree, you will have enthusiasm, self-motivation and openness to new ways of working. An understanding of digital humanities tools is essential.

This is one of the two positions currently offered by Ligatus, with the second one being a part time Research Technician.

In return, University of the Arts London offers generous leave, a final salary pension and a commitment to your continuing personal development and training in an environment that encourages excellence, creativity and diversity.

Please download an application pack and then upload your completed application here. If you have any queries about this role that are not covered in the documentation available below please contact Ewelina Warner, Ligatus Administrator. Telephone: 020 7514 6432, email: e.warner@camberwell.arts.ac.uk

University of the Arts London aims to be an equal opportunities employer embracing diversity in all areas of activity.

Professorial Platform Lecture - Professor Nicholas Pickwoad “Finding Words- The Ligatus Glossary Project”

On Thursday 3rd February 2011 at 6:00 p.m. in the Rootstein Hopkins East Space, London College of Fashion, John Princes Street,
Professor Nicholas Pickwoad will give a lecture “Finding Words- The Ligatus Glossary Project” as a part of the UAL Professorial Platform.

All crafts, trades and disciplines sooner or later develop their own specialist vocabularies to allow their practitioners to communicate quickly, easily and clearly when going about their everyday activities. In the more literate areas of life – medicine and law for instance – these vocabularies have survived and remain, if not in use, at least in older records, but the more artisan trades have often lost their words as techniques have changed and new ways of doing things have evolved. This is certainly the case with bookbinding, where our current, inherited vocabulary has shown itself quite unable to cope with the description of the detailed techniques and structures of books sometimes no more than two hundred years old. Even where terms have survived, the same terms have sometimes been used to mean different things, or different things have been included under the same term. As the study of the history of bookbinding develops, and its value as an essential but hitherto largely disregarded part of the history of the book becomes ever clearer, so the need for a consistent glossary of terms becomes ever more apparent. The Ligatus Glossary project is trying to supply this need, working with the old terms and inventing new ones in equal measure, and delivering the result on-line in a new, hierarchical schema designed around the structure of the book itself, in an attempt to pin down the extraordinary diversity of technique used over two millennia to make the tens of millions of books that fill our libraries

Study Day in Memory of Professor Ihor Ševčenko

The Study Day will be concentrated around Saint Catherine’s Monastery at Mount Sinai, its manuscripts and their conservation and will take place at Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies, University of Oxford on Saturday, 27 November.

This meeting, held in memory of the late Professor Ihor Ševčenko of Harvard University, is intended to focus
attention within the scholarly community on the conservation work currently being carried out on the important
collection of ancient and medieval manuscripts housed in the library of Saint Catherine’s Monastery at Mount
Sinai. This conservation work is organized and funded by the Saint Catherine Foundation. The lectures listed
below are being given, many by colleagues at Oxford, to commemorate the contribution made to the study of
the Sinai monastery by Ihor Ševčenko. He was a member of the Board of Directors of the American Associates
of the Saint Catherine Foundation, as well as past Visiting Fellow of both All Souls and Wolfson Colleges,
Oxford and member of the Editorial Board of Oxford Studies in Byzantium. A memorial fund in his name will
be announced for the conservation of Sinai’s early Slavonic manuscripts in which he was particularly interested.

10:00 Prof. Dr Peter Grossmann (Cairo), The Sinai monastery that Justinian built
10:40 Prof. Cyril Mango (Oxford), Ihor Ševčenko and the Sinai Monastery
11:00 coffee
11:30 Prof. Nicholas Pickwoad (London), The Programme of MS Conservation at Sinai
12:00. Dr Lukas Schachner (Oxford), Book & other Production in Early Byzantine Monasteries
12:30 lunch
2:00 Mr Nigel Wilson (Oxford), Byzantine Libraries
2:30 Dr Nancy Ševčenko (Vermont), MSS copied at Sinai
3:00 Dr Georgi Parpulov (Oxford), Greek and Latin MSS at Sinai
3:30 tea
4:00 Dr Sebastian Brock (Oxford), Syriac, Ethiopic and Arabic MSS at Sinai
4:30 Prof. Robert Thomson (Oxford), Georgian, Caucasian Albanian and Armenian MSS at Sinai
5:00 Dr C.M. MacRobert (Oxford), Slavonic MSS at Sinai
5:30 The Ihor Ševčenko Memorial Fund
6:30 Ashmolean Museum, reception

Study Day is supported by the Saint Catherine Foundation, Oxford Centre for Byzantine Research, and
Oxford Centre for Late Antiquity. For further information write to: cyril.mango@exeter.ox.ac.uk or
marlia.mango@arch.ox.ac.uk

John Latham: Anarchive at Whitechapel Gallery

This Saturday, you are invited to two events that coincide with the final weekend of the exhibition 'John Latham: Anarchive' at the Whitechapel Gallery organised by the Ligatus Research Centre and supported by AHRC and PRS Foundation.

Saturday 4 September at 2pm

FLAT TIME/sounding

A composition and performance by composer/author David Toop based on John Latham's ideas of Flat Time.

Performers:

David Toop: laptops, flutes, strings, amplified processes, omnipresent score.

John Butcher: saxophones, etc...

Phil Durrant: Maschine, etc...

Aleks Kolkowski: gramophones, Stroh violin, etc...

+Roger Turner: percussive markers

John Latham's 'Flat Time Hypothesis of 2000' elaborates on various forms of art, sound and those immaterial and mysteriously insubstantial events that exist as anomalies within our predominately space-based, object-based materialistic epistemology.

David Toop Highlights Flat Time's affinity to the conceptual framework of an improvising musician, innately understanding and responding to the world in terms of events.

Commissioned by Ligatus, University of the Arts, London on behalf of the John Latham Archive and supported with funds from the PRS Foundation

http://www.whitechapelgallery.org/shop/index.php/fuseaction/shop.product...

This will be followed at 4pm by the launch of a new DVD of John Latham’s films,

John Latham
Films 1960 – 1971

John Latham (1921- 2006) was one of the most important British artists of the post-war period, and is best remembered for his painting and sculptural works which incorporated materials such as glass, canvas and books. Less well-known, but now restored after several decades out of circulation, are the six films which Latham made during the 1960s and early 1970s. Through playful and varied use of stop-frame animation, these films, including the stroboscopic collage Speak (1962) and the cosmological meditation Erth (1971) developed the concepts of ‘time-base’ and ‘structure in events’ previously explored in his works. The DVD includes all Latham’s completed films as well as previously unseen documentation. The DVD is co-published by LUX & Lisson Gallery.

Both events are FREE

Venue details:

Whitechapel Gallery
77-82 Whitechapel High Street
London E1 7QX

http://www.whitechapelgallery.org

Underground and rail links: Aldgate East , Liverpool Street, Tower Gateway DLR

The Portable John Latham - Book Launch

Please join us to celebrate the launch of 'The Portable John Latham'.

A collection of unpublished or rarely seen documents from the John Latham Archive Edited by Antony Hudek and Athanasios Velios

Thursday 15 July 2010, 6­9pm

Whitechapel Gallery
77­ 82 Whitechapel High Street
London E1 7QX

Published by Occasional Papers in association with Whitechapel Gallery, London, on the occasion of the exhibition John Latham: Anarchive, 2 April­ - 5 September 2010

Funded by Ligatus/Camberwell College of Arts With the support of AHRC, Cassochrome and the John Latham Foundation.

Occasional Papers

Professor Nicholas Pickwoad at IADA Symposium Prague 2010

The International Institute of Book & paper Conservators has invited Professor Nicholas Pickwoad to talk about Book Boxes: A New Design in Stainless Steel during the symposium "Out of sight - Out of mind?"

The symposium, which is taking place in National Museum in Prague from 27-28 May will be dedicated to the broad theme of collection management of paper-related cultural heritage. Presentations should focus on issues such as storage, storage environment, enclosures, digitization, risk management and related subjects.

John Latham's Anarchive - co-curated by Antony Hudek and Athanasios Velios

http://www.whitechapelgallery.org/exhibitions/john-latham-anarchive

The remarkable archive of British artist John Latham (1921-2006) is explored through this exhibition inspired by his engagement with Fyodor Dostoevsky’s novel The Brothers Karamazov (1880). Each section is envisaged through the character of the three eponymous brothers. Mitya is an amoral and decadent sensualist; Ivan is an inflexible rationalist; and the youngest brother Alyosha is a kind and loving witness who attempts to relieve the suffering of others. They offer avatars for this celebration of Latham’s complex thought and work, presented through sketches, diagrams and photographs. Latham had a visionary outlook that questioned scientific thought. An important contributor to the Destruction in Art Symposium (1966) and a founder member of the Artist Placement Group (1966-89) he created performances, paintings, assemblages, sculptures and films. This apparently eclectic practice was united by his concept of Event Structures and Flat Time Theory. Through his experimental and radical work he linked science and art, proving influential in both fields.

Though a prominent figure from the 1960s onwards, the diversity of Latham’s work and the complexity of his ideas remain largely unknown beyond specialist circles. The exhibition explores the fundamental concepts that shaped his art, also including material from Flat Time House, the artist’s residency in South London and now home to the John Latham Archive.

John Latham: Anarchive is co-curated by Antony Hudek, Athanasios Velios, Research Fellows at Ligatus, University of the Arts, London, and Nayia Yiakoumaki, Archive Curator, Whitechapel Gallery. John Latham’s Archive is the subject of an AHRC research project developed by Ligatus Research Unit, UAL. With thanks to Elisa Kay, curator of the Flat Time House; and Anna Ridley of Annalogue Limited, commissioner of the Dadarama series.

The Whitechapel Gallery is grateful for the support of the John Latham Foundation; the Lisson Gallery; the Exhibition Circle, Richard Saltoun and those who wish to remain anonymous.

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